The Filmatelist

rezonville:

Back to Iraq. At great cost to my own eyesight, I think I can read the postmark as 5th February 1927, which is in period for the stamp, and of course this was posted in Basra. Stamp is SG 47, and apparently depicts the Al-Kadhimiya Mosque in Baghdad. This stamp is from the first (and most attractive, IMO) set designed specifically for Iraq. Looking at the scan though it seems like the perspective on the minarets is a bit wonky, but it’s still a very nice design.

filavaria:

Sherlock Holmes, the Final Problem

This English postage stamp depicts a scene from Conan Doyle’s book “The Final Problem”: Holmes and Moriarty struggling at Reichenbach Falls (in Switzerland).
Doyle had the intention to end the stories of the detective by suggesting the death of Sherlock Holmes.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle thought that he had gotten rid of Sherlock Holmes. He killed him off in The Final Problem, in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Doyle was tired of Holmes, and wanted to get on to serious writing. So, at Reichenbach Falls, Holmes had a final confrontation with Moriarty, they wrestled at the edge of the cliff, and they both fell to their deaths into the falls. Watson deduces that, since neither Holmes nor Moriarty came back down the only path from the falls, then both must have died. The end.

But, the public, and Doyle’s publishers, had not had enough of Sherlock Holmes. And Doyle reluctantly brought him back to life. In The Adventure of the Empty House, in The Return of Sherlock Holmes, we find that Holmes had survived the fight at Reichenbach Falls. He had rock-climbed up the cliff, and that is why he didn’t come back down the path from the falls. Once Watson had left, he climbed down, and went on to explore the Himalayas, letting Watson (and therefore, the rest of the world) think that he was dead. He did this to avoid his many enemies, one or the other of whom, he says, would eventually kill him. Makes sense.

perfoff:

Mills & Millers, Chris Killip
Isle Of Man 2009

perfoff:

Mills & Millers, Chris Killip

Isle Of Man 2009

philatelicallyspeaking:

USA - 1939 World’s Fair - April 1, 1939 - Scott #853





I was in New York this past week and it brought to mind these great Art Deco looking stamps from 1939 and the New York World’s Fair. Shown are the Trylon and Perisphere from the fair.
This stamp made quite a visual impression on me when I began collecting stamps in the 1960’s. Although it lacks the bright colors of today’s stamps, I consider it one of the best. This 74 year old stamp is still a looker.

philatelicallyspeaking:

USA - 1939 World’s Fair - April 1, 1939 - Scott #853

I was in New York this past week and it brought to mind these great Art Deco looking stamps from 1939 and the New York World’s Fair. Shown are the Trylon and Perisphere from the fair.

This stamp made quite a visual impression on me when I began collecting stamps in the 1960’s. Although it lacks the bright colors of today’s stamps, I consider it one of the best. This 74 year old stamp is still a looker.

exilebibliophile:

Shakespeare USPS 5-cent stamp 1964 by fantomaster on Flickr.
Via Flickr: William Shakespeare (1564-1616) postal stamp released in Stratford, CT on August 14, 1964. 123,245,000 issued.

exilebibliophile:

Shakespeare USPS 5-cent stamp 1964 by fantomaster on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
William Shakespeare (1564-1616) postal stamp released in Stratford, CT on August 14, 1964. 123,245,000 issued.

filavaria:

The 25 de Abril Bridge (Ponte 25 de Abril “25th of April Bridge”) is a suspension bridge connecting the city of Lisbon, capital of Portugal, to the municipality of Almada on the left (south) bank of the Tejo river. 
It was inaugurated on August 6, 1966 and a train platform was added in 1999. 

Because it is a suspension bridge and has similar coloring, it is often compared to the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, USA. 
In fact, it was built by the same company (American Bridge Company) that constructed the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge and not the Golden Gate, also explaining its similarity in design. 

Until 1974, the bridge was named Salazar Bridge (Ponte Salazar).